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Qustions on learning to code

 
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TheSteelJunkie
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2018 8:29 am    Post subject: Qustions on learning to code Reply with quote

I am 14 and new to coding/ Programing... my goal is to get really heavy in to reverse engineering but I'm having a hard time with ASM and C so
I started looking at Python and Java and they seem much easier for me to learn with.
My question is Should I keep trying to learn C and ASM only or is it a good ideal to learn Java/Python first and get the hang of coding then move to C/C++ ASM?
Because TBH I tried really hard to learn ASM but it's klingon
I then jumped over to C but the learning curve there is steep also.

I do not understand why it's so hard to understand for me but it really is, I know I really need C and ASM for what I want to do but Java/Python just seem to click right away for me, I learned in 3 days of Python what took me 3 weeks in C.

Please C/ASM coders tell me what you would do, thanks for reading.
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TheyCallMeTim13
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2018 8:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think the learn c++ web site is a good read for any one learning to program.
And M.I.T. has the open course ware they host. And I would learn that basic concepts of programming before worrying about any one language, to me it's like a carpenter learning to use one hammer, at some point you will have to use a saw.

http://www.learncpp.com/

https://ocw.mit.edu/index.htm

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TheSteelJunkie
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2018 9:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you so much for this info the Introductory Programming Courses may be the best find yet, I found some classes on Linda dot com,
Foundations of Programming. Fundamentals
Foundations of Programming. Code Efficiency
Foundations of Programming. Design Patterns
Intro to Computer Science. 101
Intro to Computer Science. 201
Intro to Computer Science. 301

I may buy them as well. I'll give the cpp and MIT stuff a shot first see where it gets me.
On a side note if anyone can give me anymore recommendations of any class type learning that you feel would better me I would be very grateful.
Thanks again TheyCallMeTim13 this is the most helpful information anyone ever gave me.
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FreeER
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2018 9:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would not suggest starting out with assembly. It's too detailed to do anything semi-complex and the APIs often have odd things due to how it used to work at one point in time. And honestly I couldn't write a program in asm to save my life right now Smile I know enough to hack around in other programs and I'm certainly capable of figuring it out given time, but I don't actually know it Smile

C/C++ is better, but I'd still recommend following a proper course / tutorial and having some form of support network that you can go to, personally I recommend http://cs50.edx.org as an introduction (I believe it also introduces python now though it didn't when I took it).

If you're having trouble with that after some effort and asking for help (of course it's expected to be difficult if you haven't done anything similar before!) then I'd recommend taking a step back and doing some basic courses that cover some programming logic like http://khanacademy.org/computing/computer-programming has for JavaScript. Not the HTML/JS one, the Advanced-JS ones, though you'd likely need to go through the Drawing/Animation one first since it covers the basics. You'll also find a dozen or so shorter "Hour of Code" sites around that are also decent very early-introductions (some are of course better than others).

Things that teach the syntax and what library functions exist etc. are great for picking up a new language and finding what functions will do what you want (or if you need to create your own) but they don't do shit for actually getting you used to planning out the steps necessary to accomplish a goal (ie. programming) Smile And if you can't plan at least a few basic things out yourself then how are you supposed to read an obfuscated version of someone else's plan (reverse engineering)? lol

https://www.quora.com/What-are-the-top-websites-computer-science-students-must-visit may also be useful
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OldCheatEngineUser
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2018 12:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

to make it short:
skip re & asm, and dont ask for the requirements.
just go for something in your knowledge level.

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TheyCallMeTim13
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2018 6:10 pm    Post subject: This post has 1 review(s) Reply with quote

So the M.I.T. one is my personal pick, but Stanford and Princeton also have some, but I have never really checked these out my self.

https://www.class-central.com/university/stanford
https://www.class-central.com/university/princeton

Like @FreeER said.
http://khanacademy.org/
Sal Khan, solid Dude, great idea, great site. Lots of cool stuff to learn.

So as everyone else has said up to this point ASM is processor specific. And while a lot doesn't change, a lot does, and really ASM tends to be used more for speed critical processes. But any more compilers are fairly good at getting this right, some times better than programmers can. So while it's good to mess with some ASM for debugging (or hacking and/or reversing video games) just don't worry about learning it or knowing it so much. I don't really know ASM, but I can work with it. I've never meat any one that really says they "know" ASM, you'll tend to hear that we're all just learning ASM.

So to me, you have the low level languages (ASM, FASM, MASM, NASM, ...) these are processor specific, this is the basement a lot of action but no one really likes to spend too much time here.
Then the mid level languages (C, C++, Pascal, ...), these are often a little older and can often be over looked due to their learning curve. But they are used for all sorts of things, even operating systems, and for all sorts of devices and controllers. This is the ground floor, and as with any thing the ground floor can be the best place to start.
Then you got the "high (falutin)" languages, lots of bling up in the penthouse but they always feel empty and confined to me. And when you know some systems (mid level) languages, then these just tend to be more about learning their quirks. Then just APIs mostly, and APIs change.

In the end I would really say, learn a few. I love Python, but it's not always the best tool for the job. But if you like Python write a Fibonacci sequencer with it. If you like Perl write a text parser with it. But also look at what you want to do with this, want to code games and engines then C and C++ will be big ones to learn. Want to write algorithms used to calculate how long to thrust booster rockets to sling shot around a planet, well I really think they go with special purpose languages but I think Python is a good starting point. And I learned that all languages are ever changing and dynamic, they're dictated by the people that speak them, and I think this holds true for programming languages as well. And I was taught to learn how to speak to people, not speak a language. So I say learn to speak to computers, don't learn a language. Languages die off, but how we talk never really changes.

EDIT:
And on a side note I wouldn't spend too much time on OS specific languages, OS API's and libraries are fine. But OS specific languages are like chaining your self to a brink before a race, you'll never get it off in time after it starts. But they are fine for learning and they are even better for some projects than others can be.

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Last edited by TheyCallMeTim13 on Wed Jan 31, 2018 6:59 pm; edited 2 times in total
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OldCheatEngineUser
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2018 6:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TheyCallMeTim13 wrote:
So I say learn to speak to computers, don't learn a language. Languages die off, but how we talk never really changes.

rep, just for someone wise like me.

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